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into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic
written about laura's law that some of the post poignant arguments from family members that they have done everything they can do but don't know how to help a loved one. what would you have done? could force treatment made a difference? >> yes. absolutely. laura's law is not forced treatment. i don't know why mr. vega keeps using that word because laura's law is an upfront tool before somebody needs crisis. if they are proven to be a danger to themselves or someone else, a judge tries to get a treatment team and they try to talk with this person and figure out a way for them to stay out of the hospital. we have forced treatment, we have 51/50. my son has been through 51/50 numerous times. he's been slammed with this. this is a horrible experience. laura's law is a tool, only a tool that may help. for whoever can help, and thank god they don't to have go through the other part. i would say the same thing as this officer said is that some people can't help themselves. the not civil to sit here and watch people lose their lives. i can tell you that. i have been in groups for 4-and-a-half y
's . that started some conversations that initiate neighborhoods and law enforcement on the nightlife and entertainment. because of some of the work that you have done here, we have moved some conversations politically in which we have much more collaboration, much more cooperation and much more creativity when it comes to brainstorming. i want to thank your office to help us enforce the rules and i want to thank those in this room as well as those in c mac that gave my office ideas to make sure our party planning world would make sure it's successful that folks that operate parking lots are also responsible partners. all of these could not come from the work that all of you are doing with our entertainment commission staff to make sure that we are working together and moving in the right direction to ensure that we have the most successful and the best an most exciting nightlife in the country. i'm really excited about the fact that within a few short months we are going to be kicking off the america's cup in my district and hopefully we'll have the most amazing parties to entertain
. there has been many debates on how to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health
up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court as long as 120-150 days in jail. my of
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forw
's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's p
. then because we have no money, we reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probably claiming that their prison conditions are inadequate and they are probably right. they might be claiming that they haven't received their medication, they are probably right. they are probably -- they often complaining that they were overcharged and over sentence. they probably right. we refer them as much as we can to those that might be able to help them. from then we begin the triage process to see if there is any kind of assistance once we investigate and if we are able to litigate it. >> thank you. next i would like to ask jim, poor people who are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries
taxpayers. thought it's thirty year career in law enforcement he's unsuccessful lowered crime in all positions >> (speaking spanish.) >> successful lowered crime inl positions >> (speaking spanish.) >>successful lowered crime in a positions >> (speaking spanish.) >> so you know i have to translate in english what you just said robert to. we would like to impress 3 the da is cuban for those cubans on a the house and at the age of 13 he it came here to the united states and a has been successful so we would like to welcome our district attorney george (clapping) >> (speaking spanish.) >> i was telling you earlier that i'm kooulg but my wife is mexican and i'm surround by mexicans all my life so you know i think before we get into the awards here i want inform say a if you words because i think that's a real movement of celebration the mayor talked about the due process of ordinance which is so well-connected to the way that we live here and the way that san francisco way. it's also important to talk about what's going on at the state level because this past week ore governor s
his law degree from harvard please welcome supervisor david campos. thank you good evening. i'm so honored to be in front of of this amazing crowd it's a good lucking crowd. i want to acknowledge a bunch of folks i see the superintendant of our schools >> (speaking spanish.) >> (clapping) i'll be brief this evening should be about the students. but i want to say we've had some pretty incredible accomplishments as a latino community. we heard about the trust act passed in sacramento and thank you governor and absolutely and, of course, here at the local level thank you to john avalos and the entire community to worked to make sure we have no longer a relationship with immigration here 90 in san francisco. >> (speaking spanish.) >> we also have heard from ed lee the mayor thank you for being here because we are closing the accomplishment gap and missions schools have a wait list people trying to goat into those schools. >> (speaking spanish.) >> but before i mention i bring the students such as we've accomplished as a community we have some struggles and challenges the biggest
there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your r
emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the re
bar tenders guild. the liquor laws don't allow us to use alcohol in training. the bar tenders schools in california are a joke. it's a cheap industry where hopeful bar tenders are hoping to take a $300-500 course to use colored liquid. if we are expected to do this for educational purposes, i imagine that we have to do the same thing, to go through the legislators to propose that to the public and propose it to the abc. i believe this nightlife summit was create because of problems in the public, there was problems with noise, problems with over drinking, a lot of our laws are based on that. i'm here to propose that we have more responsible training for our bar tenders and servers. the cocktail boom around the country has turned bartenders into a true professional. now that professional bartender's job is in question. >> i'm sure it's around the whole notion of where you can drink alcohol and the idea of one of those courses or presentations or event would whether or not it would constitute a public, somebody opened to the public or whether it was essentially amounting to commercial
. in 2010 there was an attempt to make it a law to have night clubs have security cameras and our mayor made a very clear statement that that was not something that our city wanted. also, if the police department wants footage, there are legal ways to go about getting footage if it exist. putting a condition on a permit to side step those laws, those processes, it's not good for our community. if the police department wants to have cameras outside of my business, let them engage the community and let them do it themselves. i'm not interested in participating in surveillance on my patrons. >> so, do you think that -- [ applause ] >> do you think that more businesses should bear the cost or not bear the cost of cameras instead of the city bearing the cost. >> i think the city should have cameras. there are places where that is useful. having cameras near registers can save many dollars. if you believe your clientele is potentially violent on damaging in terms of graffiti cost, you can have many reasons to have cameras. if a business wants to install their cameras and use them, they should bear
bpa, it would set a precedent for other laws and market based changes that could have a big domino effect on our exposures, especially to endocrine disrupting compounds, you go back to standard you may have used in college, i did when i didn't have any money was to soak the beans, it's way cheaper, avoids canned food exposure, also to go with frozen or fresh vegetables if you can rather than cans, to choose stainless steel water bottles and other alternatives for baby bottles if you have young children and to change markets and to change laws because we know there are a lot of inequities that shapes who has access to healthy foods and fresh fruits,, we need to change some laws that these canned foods are safer, and more foods are available. we've gone into a can of corn, i don't know if you got that, we dove into this can of corn to talk about the bpa act, from representative ann marky from the house and senator from the senate, and this bans [inaudible] food and beverage containers, from infant and toddlers food, from everything, from adults, pregnant women, some important popula
to pass laws. >> radiation is the longest and best studied exposure link to breast cancer and what can we do about that, some radiation is naturally occurring, but we know that since 1980, radiation exposures for the average person have doubled and most of that is probably due to a 600 % increase in medical radiation, we're being exposed to a lot more radiation from medical tests, sometimes that's the only option, it's worth that added risk because the alternative is really dangerous sometimes, but we want to ensure those scans and those medical imaging tests are the most appropriate, are at the right dose, especially for kids are a lot of times, they don't know how to scale down for a child-size body and the machines may not calibrate or have clear directions on how to make that happen so in our own lives, we can ask our health care provides, are there safer alternative, mri or ultrasounds for doing this test, and then if you have kids and they need a test, ensure and ask questions about the safest dose and if they have machines that can calibrate to kids, and then we have to see these c
in the bail reform act of 1984, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment f
of violations for further report of gifts and these are laws that are designed to represent those in the public from representing the interest of those who give them money instead. and in order for the society to protect itself, the city library had to sign, every other year under penalty of perjury that he attended ethics trainings on reporting gifts and in order for this society to protect itself, the city has to sign that he has taken training and after that he has signed the perjury that he had nothing to report, while he was receiving $65,000 per year, from the friends of the library. and these statements under the penalty of perjury had no effect on inducing the city library from making the required disclosures, the reason for the signature under the penalty of pergry is to make every violation willful and to create the constructive knowledge of the regulations. advice from the office and from the library department account ants and from the lawyers from the private non-profit providing money all had no effect in enducing city library to make the required disclosures, it goes without sayi
ordnance >> the state law that specifics the 5 years. >> oh, sorry. thank you >> commissioner. >> i understand that not just the amendment is before us but the entire piece of legislation still has to be enacted so we'll look at the earlier part from an earlier hearing. >> we discussed the sort of underlying july hearing but we have not taken action on that yet. >> commissioners. >> just a question on the state law change it was 10 years for an ellis act and it switched do i have any background on why that change was made at state level. >> i don't can the planning staff answer that question. >> i don't know that's a state law beyond the planning coincide. >> but it was true it was 10 years at one point and it's now 5 years. >> the city attorney mate know. >> i believe the ellis act has always contained a tiered number of business so if you go back into business in 5 years after 10 years there's more restrictions but i understand part of the ellis act has not been amended. >> okay. thank you. >> commissioner sophie with the planning staff. i received one letter from the s
in the city's good government guide which is a summary of the public meeting laws and public record laws, the attendance of a majorty members of at policy body at a recreational gathering is not a meeting, it is one gathering is not sponsored or organized by or for the policy body. and two, the majority of the members refrain from using the occasion to discuss business within the subject matter jurisdiction of the body. >> okay. >> does that mean a minority can? >> i would have thought that anyone can't. >> a minority. less than a majority of the body can always meet and discuss. the public notice agenda requirements etc., are for when there is a quorum of the body. but that also applies to the committees. >> yes. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> all right. >> public comment? >> this item? >> seeing none. the item is closed. >> announcements. >> getting to the end. >> announcements, colleagues, any announcements? >> seeing none, any public comment? >> seeing none, can we go on to the president's announcements? >> i have three announcements, we are almost at the end of the agenda, we are ge
that's a moderate risk system that i think has failed. >> let me ask our law enforcement officials, mirkarimi and george gascÓn, do you agree with professor simon? could we have a system that didn't like to the likelihood of reoffense or what the charge is or looked whether or not someone is coming back to court. >> go ahead. >> yes, i was referencing earlier there has to be stakeholders all the page. and for the sheriff department to reclassify and allow someone to be released, pretrialed, supervi supervised and that's high majority of the time. but if there was criteria charged and not just based on discretion of the sheriff or the district attorney. but the criteria to reconfigure and acknowledge so it's a part of law in the city and county of san francisco. that to me affirms our commitment to what this experiment would look like. to make a product of the discretionary act by those elected. so goes with that experiment the tentativeness of what this commitment would actually be. why is why -- which is why i would like to see what the mayor's office and board of supervisors to
aggressively than we have, making sure that we are cracking down on folks who might be breaking the law and making it really challenging for not just other homeless people, but for folk who live in the community, making sure we're activating that area so that families feel safe and being a part of that community. i think that's a huge challenge. the other challenge, one that i dealt with even before i became supervisor, are the access to job opportunities, access to long-term job opportunities, and how do we prepare people who have never worked a job before in their entire life for long-term job opportunities? what does it mean to show up on time? what does it mean to keep your pants pulled up and take off your hat and not talk back to your boss, what does all that mean? i think what we have done as a city is focus too much on, okay, where the opportunities, local hire, which are all great programs. but the part that's missing is how do we get people prepared and how do we keep them employed. what are the long-term plan of job opportunities in san francisco look like for local san franc
because san francisco has been a beacon of hope. i sat on the board when the law was made and a today, our supreme court has struck that allowing law down (clapping) >> today, the supreme court has said our lgbt brothers and sisters have a right to the pursuit of marriage equality. so goes san francisco and so goes california so goes the country. thank you for being here (clapping) i agree with president chiu but since i'm here i don't want any more people from hate coming. i really want to give a warm welcome to supervisor david campos who has led on some many issues. supervisor david campos (clapping) >> thank you, you know, it's a very emotional moment for us from the lgbt community. thank you, mayor lee and all it's so many people who have made it possible for us to be here. we heard about harvey milk who gave his life in this building. i'm glad it was recognized. the reality is the first time the highest court in the land is recognizing our rights. that's something that's never happened in the whole history of mississippi my country. me and my partner says we are people that have di
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
a model. i know we're in a room filled with district attorneys and police officers, law enforcement. i'm curious what role law enforcement can play in restoretive justice, what can be imparted as groups of people who may or may not be connected with the trauma. once you are traumatized by the school, politicians, et cetera, et cetera, then you have more of these power dynamic things going on in your head, i'm going to exert whatever power i have on these people, i'm interested in hearing about the restoretive power that we want to be part of the change. >> our organization just had a grant to partner with the department of justice to make films on exactly those kinds of things. we're going to be making a film on working with school resource officers and how to work with students. we don't believe we should even call anyone a bully because once you get labeled it stays with you. i've gotten letters saying there's a bully in my kid's first grade. the statistics show that about a third of the kids are bullied and bully others. as one kid said, i wanted to man up and show i wasn't goin
justice was denied. however it is the enforcement and spirit and intent of these laws that challenge this century. we have much work left to do. 50 years ago, ending segregation was a dream for african americans throughout the country. education was the gateway. access to education would provide a better future for the children. today that belief remains the same. education is a pathway for future success. however access to high quality education still remains an illusions to many children. too many african american and other people of color remain segregated in other schools and determined desperate and in later life. a huge gap in problems across the country. add to that the concept of unconscious bias, low expectations and high expulsion and suspension rates and it's so many reasons why they fall below the bar. even in san francisco where we have the highest performing schools we have the highest achievement gap among african american and latino students. we need to invest more in the future of our young people. in 1964, dr. king said, the richest nation on earth has never allocat
the law - by the way, who remembers what soap is. many websites replaced the website with some kind of black and white frame. we feel we really have a model of activity we should - i'm going to tell everybody that 1, 2, and 3 to support the immigration reform. we're going to have access or the chances of services like voices 1, 2, and 3 is going to be much lower. i want to see the business owners follow suit. by the way, my wife and daughter are here and my daughter has the march t-shirt >> thank you for the practical steps and again, we have folks that are tweeting or posting there's so many ways to engage and it's easy and effective. it also means meeting people. we'll be taking another small group of ceos from small business by also start ups. in washington d.c. they only hate you when your successful. then we're going to open it up to the audience. as - >> we work with people all over the united states. we have an intelligent to do that we're suppliers there and we get to them and explain the how and why and what to do. and that's another way to leverage our networks and our s
the city employees and departments to follow the law wants to allow them to do whatever they want and then wants to advise the bodies how to avoid giving documents to the public which would expose it. and like i said, i fought with herrera and that man is an intelligent man and i knew that the documents that i was asked that we are asking for and were disposal under the public record's act. and they fought me repeatedly over the public comment. and i have at least eight in finding them in violation of the law because they didn't like what i say because i think that you can understand it because i am pretty clear, but i will say one thing for me, that i can't say that for a lot of people on the boards or commissions, and i will look you in the eye and say that to your face anything and i would not say it behind your back, but my impression is that you sit there and commission and any comments you wait until we are gone and you wait until we are gone to make them. >> >> item 8, i will hear a motion to ayearn. >> and so moved. >> and second. >> all right. >> comment on that. >> all r
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
to have zero waste in your offices. and the laws in california around the waste started with 8939 this was a state wide goal that requires all municipality to generate 50 percent of the material that they generated from the landfill by the year 2000 and steep fines could be incurd for any that did not comply. san francisco surpassed the 50 percent goal, and wanted to expand the goal and aim higher. so the board of supervisors and the commission on the environment passed a 75 percent landfill deversion resolution by 2010. and a zero waste goal by 2020. and as you know, san francisco has the highest landfill deversion rate of any large city in the country and we divert 50 percent of the material that we generate from the landfill and so that was great. and we are well known for the mandatory recycling law. and this requires everyone in san francisco and not just government, but residents and visitors to properly separate into recyclables and compost and trash and this really quicked up the composting. this is interesting, and this san francisco, deversion and disposal and generation
and well and to understand the need for even though laws have changed but mind sets hasn't. the fact that there has been no movement, no really galvanizing of people in the same way. to be able to marvel and aspire to be able to it at one time in time to be able to have a movement in the same vein. today is about acknowledging the work that is going forward to kind of keep the movement going but to also recognize and appreciate those folks who outside of the spotlight as commissioner christian said are still doing the work because it needs to be done and so this is about remembering and commemorating and also celebrating and recognizing those folks who keep the movement going. >> thank you, we'll go into the the agenda. madam secretary, please call the next item on the agenda. no. 4. >> item 4 mayor proclamation on the anniversary of the march on washington, honor's deputy chief of staff and public safety. [ applause ] >> hello. thank you, all of you for being here. good evening. you guys can do better than that. this is a big deal. i'm happy that this is what the audience looks like
this is true. it's definitely worth reading and i talks about zoning law and city politics and entrenched nonprofits. so i think he's on a very good subject and one that is worthy of consideration and i've often mentioned in comments i think we have to encourage old housing that is substandard to be sold and renovated priflg and used to build new housing for the same people in the same places. we're not seeking nearly enough and that might be the situation where people who are victims of crime coming from outside of san francisco. a good article to read and an article on the open forum by a woman who's a daughter of a fellow named william garf was a builder privately in the past and her contention is that inclusionary housing adds to the cost of low-cost housing being built and she points to the housing bill allergy governor jerry brown as appointed. and you know by state law you can satisfy all housing of protection levels will you not by inclusionary housing but it's a subject of many points. she says that it raises the cost of normal market rate lower or middle income housing that coul
into the firms and no non-manufacturing companies and get good jobs. we decided we, you know, would send a sister-in-law that somehow the united states would generate the idea and produce all in china. in response other parts of the midwest large managing or merchandising companies and northeast ohio you saw philosophical in business and other global dynamics they're seeking substantially job growth are to the benefit of not just the kids of ph.d. from stanford or mit but a whole bunch of folks coming out of high schools and colleges with technical prosecutors. >> tests map silicon valley it's great with ideas they didn't get made in china but it's great if you're an engineer or not so great if you're a generate but mayor lee how this model stacks up in terms of the collaboration. >> this would be returning the stats all the time about 17 or 18 percent of the economy so sun valley is reilly coming off of intense managing. the cooler than in the united states is this the the facebook and google realty but it's much more sophisticated. so we willing have the board come here and my recollection so evident
health care. setting aside in law that the money will be there is a promise. until we condominium the enemy of money to make those commitments work is still a promise. the commitment comes when i put the effort on the table to make health care sewer secure. the promise is nice but we have to figure out how to deliver and the funds that are available so far from the measure that the supervisor vitals i cites are again, a nice probable but that's not realty. when we passed prop a we should know where the resources come from >> we hope this information has been information active. please visit the san francisco sf elections.org. remember the voting t is available in city hall be sure to vo november 5th. >> ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ hi, i'm marconi i'm here to discuss prop b the measure will be before the voters on test november 5th. they have a proposed site called - prop c is an referendum. a referendum is the process by which the voters can proof or reject legislation. a 3 point plus acres is on washington street. on 2012 the board of supervisors approved the construction of two
is the immigration law. that's the only thing we need to tweak. thank you very much >> alexander thank you. we're going to move on. >> my immigration story is similar to a lot of entrepreneurs. i came to the united states to pursue a masters in technology. i love my experience being part of the education system and getting a masters and learning from people who were innovating things themselves and teaching students how to do. being able to be there and being able to be a part of this is incredible. i moved to the valley area to an internship here. my very first job was a start up. trying to take an idea it was so inspiring. being able to experience that desired me to start my own business. i came over on the student visa and working for different employers i was tied to the employer who was definitely very limiting. the process take a long time. but finally, i was able to get a gastrocard and start my own business. that's important and being able to be a part of this in this debate on immigration reform is critical. personally immigration reform t is important for me. i care a lot about fin
taxes pr is there any way for the immigration officers to interpreter the law like they do in japan >> what a great question and compelling question. >> our office does a lot of reviews in the immigration issues. i have a colleague here and he's our senior advisors. fred and i work very closely in giving adjudication issues as they relate to a start up business whether in the h b context we're very involved and providing recommendations to ac i s in how to improve + jurisdictions in policy and training. we welcome our comments and ideas but case examples that reflect miss application of the laws. make sure you have our card before i leave and a maria thank you for responding >> we have two speakers and literally are out of time. >> my name is juan gomez i gntd from columbia. i wanted to ask i talk about what you can do in the middle america i move forward from kansas city so i know that middle america looks up to san francisco. so what can the city's do not only the tech world is leading the world but in the technology industries they're not as progressive as in the tech communi
behind closed doors. the governor signed a bill into law and my office and the l.a. county sheriff have committed to keeping track and data of crimes that occur involving the internet or social media because we frankly don't have good data around that, particularly involved with crime so for the next couple of years we do will a lot of data collection and working with law enforcement and they're doing it and address this problem from evidence and outcome based area. thank you. >> thank you. >> no name other than more work for nance's staff. -- >> what we do in oakland -- i don't think bullying is more than a school issue. this is bully center thed. there is a way the violence perm mates across the board and i strongly believe that schools are the heart of health and community well being and the way we're going to transform this world is coming around our kids. we have a sacred obligation and kids to be safe and well connected and well known is all of us, all of us, all the time and even in the room today and the pretense and around the punter -- the question is if it came from the
's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self r
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